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Newcrest’s anti-violence fight goes offshore

Staff Reporter | 3:48 PM |
Two gold operations in the country have for the first time joined efforts to highlight the connection between a happy home and community and a safe and productive workplace.
Newcrest-Lihir accepted an invitation to participate at Porgera’s National Mine Safety Week recently and witnessed Porgera launch its Women in Mining (WiM) initiative as part of the programme.
Newcrest Lihir’s anti-violence advisor Margaret Yanda, who coordinates the Trupla Man Trupla Meri anti-violence and behavior change program, and Healthy Business consultant Eric Tamo represented Lihir at Porgera to support Barrick’s commitment to strengthen diversity in its workforce.
Ms Yanda, in her address towards the Porgera workforce described Lihir’sTrupla Man Trupla Meri (TMTM) program as men and women displaying integrity, care, honesty, commitment and responsibility, and emphasized that TMTM linked happy and healthy homes and communities to safe productive workplaces.
Mr Tamo conducted a diet campaign based on diets, subsistence gardening, home cooking, food preparation, family health and women and children’s health with the message to focus on empowering the workforce to make healthy and safe choices at work and at home.
Porgera’s Occupational Health and Safety Manager Robin Sheahan, thanked Newcrest-Lihir, highlighting it had delivered a remarkable and inspiring session to the workforce in Porgera.
“It is the first time for our workforce to engage in such a motivational and encouraging session onsite,” he said.
Ms Yanda said Lihir is committed towards creating a diverse and inclusive workplace where everyone feels safe, valued and empowered to perform at their best.
Porgera is not new to Ms Yanda. She started her mining career at Porgera as a two-day-a week laborer with the OHS Department in October 2004 and later built her career in safety.
“When I started my career at Porgera gold mine, women were not given the opportunity to operate haul trucks in the open pit or work under ground as engineers, surveyors, and geologist or even as fitters in workshops and many other fields.
Those jobs were dominated by males until recently. Females are now able to participate and contribute equally and it is our responsibility to encourage the numbers to grow,” she said. Post Courier